Bible Articles on the Topic of Trumpet

The following articles have been compiled and indexed by inWORD Bible software.

The Trumpet

In ancient Israel, each city had a person positioned upon the wall in order to call out a warning about the approach of unexpected and possibly hostile people. This watchman had to “sound the trumpet” if an enemy was approaching, so that the townspeople could get ready for an attack. Prophets in Israel took on the function of spiritual “watchmen” (Ezekiel 3:17; Jeremiah 6:17), warning the people of impending punishment by God unless the nation changed its way.

A Shofar Symbolizes the Binding of the Evil Inclination

The Gemara (Rosh Hashana 16a) states: “Why do we use a Shofar [horn] from a ram? [Answer:] Because God said, ‘Blow before me a Shofar of a ram and I will recall the merit of “Akeidat Yitzchak”—Yitzchak’s [Isaac’s] binding on the altar. [Avraham offered-up a ram after he was forbidden to sacrifice his son]. Furthermore, I will view you as if you have bound yourselves on the altar’.”

The Walls of Jericho

Physics is pitted against a Bible story with this simple question: could a team of trumpeters really bring down the walls of Jericho?

Horn

hôrn (Hebrew and Aramaic קרן, ḳeren; κέρας, kéras; for the “ram’s horn” (יובל, yōbhēl) of Joshua 6 see MUSIC, and for the “inkhorn” of Ezekiel 9:1-11 (קסת, ḳeṣeth) see separate article):

Trumpets, Feast of

In Leviticus 23:23-25 the first day (new moon) of the seventh month is set apart as a solemn rest, “a memorial of blowing of trumpets” (the Hebrew leaves “of trumpets” to be understood), signalized further by “a holy convocation,” abstinence from work, and the presentation of “an offering made by fire.” In Numbers 29:1-6 these directions are repeated, with a detailed specification of the nature of the offering. In addition to the usual daily burnt sacrifices and the special offerings for new moons, there are to be offered one bullock, one ram, and seven he-lambs, with proper meal offerings, together with a he-goat for a sin offering.

Wind instruments

The first mention of a wind instrument occurs in Genesis 4:21, where we are told that Jubal was the “father of all such as handle the harp and pipe.” The Hebrew word here translated “pipe” is ‛ūghābh. It occurs in 3 other places: Job 21:12; 30:31; Psalms 150:4. In the Hebrew version of Daniel 3:5 it is given as the rendering of sumpōnyāh, i.e. “bagpipe.” Jerome translations by organon. The ‛ūghābh was probably a primitive shepherd’s pipe or panpipe, though some take it as a general term for instruments of the flute kind, a meaning that suits all the passages cited.

Trumpet

Trumpet is in the A.V. usually the rendering of one or the other of the two Hebrew words detailed below; but besides these it occasionally stands as the representative of the following: יוֹבֵל,Exodus 19:13, the jubilee (q.v.) trumpet; תָּקוֹעִ takea, Ezekiel 7:14, prop. the blowing of the trumpet. SEE TRUMPETS, FEAST OF.

Be Ready for Attack

Trumpet

Blew the Trumpets

Trumpet

Blowing of the Trumpets

Trumpet

Blow the Trumpet

Trumpet

Blow the Trumpet In Zion

trumpet

Blow the Trumpet In Zion

trumpet

Gidion’s Battle with the Medianites

Trumpet

The Great Hailing

trumpet

Levites Playing Music in the Holy Temple (1972 acrylic)

Trumpet

Music Players

Trumpet

Signal to Gather

Trumpet

Smashing the Jars

Trumpet

Sneaking Up to the Camp of the Midianites

Trumpet

Spying the Camp of the Midianitess

Trumpet

Temple Court Musicians

Trumpet

Temple Musicians

Trumpet

Shofar

A shofar (pron. /ʃoʊˈfɑːr/, from Hebrew:  שׁוֹפָר , [ʃoˈfaʁ]) is an ancient musical horn made of ram’s horn, used for Jewish religious purposes. Like the modern bugle, the shofar lacks pitch-altering devices. All pitch control is done by varying the player’s embouchure. The shofar is blown in synagogue services on Rosh Hashanah and at the very end of Yom Kippur, and is also blown every weekday morning in the month of Elul running up to Rosh Hashanah. Shofars come in a variety of sizes and shapes, depending on the choice of animal and level of finish.