Bible Articles on the Topic of Tree of Life

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Help with Old Testament Allusions

In Isaiah 65:22-25, the Septuagint rescues a delightful allusion which is otherwise liable to get lost. In the prophet’s entrancing picture of the kingdom, “as the days of a tree shall be the days of my people.” This is impressive indeed when you think of the age of Californian redwoods. But the Septuagint says: “As the days of the Tree of Life”! — and this is transparently correct, for the prophecy continues: “mine elect shall long enjoy the work of their hands” — contrast the curse of unremitting toil put on Adam. Septuagint: “My chosen shall not toil in vain, nor beget children for the curse (the curse in Eden), for they are the seed of the Blessed of the Lord (belonging to the Seed of the Woman)... and dust shall be the serpent’s meat.” It is the Septuagint which supplies the clue here.

Paradise the Two Trees After the Exile

Paradise literally means “a park,” “a pleasure ground”. The Genesis story, Chapter 1, brings before us just such a “Paradise” as set up in “The Garden of Eden”. We are told that it was a garden of trees, for food, set there for the first created man and woman, Adam and Eve. In the midst of the Garden grew two special and very important trees;

The Purpose of the Tree of Life

Questions: Did Adam and Eve need the Tree of Life to keep them living in the Garden of Eden? What was the purpose of the Tree of Life?

Shoftim II

“Man is [like] the tree of the field.” —Shoftim 20:19

The Purpose of the Tree of Life

Questions: Did Adam and Eve need the Tree of Life to keep them living in the Garden of Eden? What was the purpose of the Tree of Life?

The Curse Of Immortality

One of the earliest texts that we conditionalists turn to for support of our outlandish theories about human mortality is Genesis 3:22. Some modern translations treat the text as God making a prohibition against human access to the tree of life:

Tree of life

Stood also in the midst of the garden of Eden (Genesis 2:9; 3:22). Some writers have advanced the opinion that this tree had some secret virtue, which was fitted to preserve life. Probably the lesson conveyed was that life was to be sought by man, not in himself or in his own power, but from without, from Him who is emphatically the Life (John 1:4; 14:6). Wisdom is compared to the tree of life (Proverbs 3:18). The “tree of life” spoken of in the Book of Revelation (Revelation 2:7; 22:2, 14) is an emblem of the joys to be found in the kingdom of God.

Tree of Life

(חיּים עץ, ‛ēc ḥayyīm; ξύλον τῆς ζωῆς, xúlon tḗs zōḗs): The expression “tree of life” occurs in four groups or connections: (1) in the story of the Garden of Eden, (2) in the Proverbs of the Wise Men, (3) in the apocryphal writings, and (4) in the Apocalypse of John.

Tree Of Life

According to Genesis 2:9, there stood in the midst of the Garden of Eden a “tree of life,” apparently by the side of the “tree of knowledge of good and evil.” Although Genesis 3:3 seems to presuppose but one tree there, Genesis 3:22 asserts that, after the primitive pair had eaten of the tree of knowledge, they were expelled from Eden lest they should put forth their hands and take of the tree of life and live forever. The view of the writer was that Eden contained a tree the magical power of the fruit of which conferred immortality upon him who partook of it, though YHWH prohibited mortals from partaking of this fruit.

Tree of Life

Whatever may have been the frame and texture of Adam’s body while in Eden, it is certain that, being “of the earth, it was earthy,” and was thus liable to disease and exposed to decay; just as his soul; at the same time, was liable to the greater evil of temptation by being exposed to the power of the tempter. Hence, while “every tree of the garden was given for food,” the tree of life, in the midst of the garden, was provided by Infinite Wisdom as the appointed antidote of disease or decay of the body while, at the same time, the enjoyment of spiritual life, or the indwelling of the spirit of God, and the right of access to the tree of life, thus securing immortality, were conditioned on our first parents not eating the forbidden fruit of the tree of knowledge (Genesis 2:9-17). The various references to the “tree of life” evidently consider it to have been the divinely appointed medium for securing the immortality of our first parents (Proverbs 3:18; 11:30; Ezekiel 47:12; Revelation 2:7; 22:2,14). See Reineccius, De Arbore Vitae (Weissenf. 1722). SEE LIFE.

The Angel Shows Saint John the Fountain of Living Water (16th c. engraving)

Tree of Life

Fruit Tree

Tree of life

Greet Jesus with ’Palm Branches’

Tree of life

River of Life

Tree of Life

Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil

Tree of Life

Tree of Life (2004 etching)

Tree of Life

Tree of Life

Tree of Life

Twelve Crops of Fruit

Tree of Life

Two Trees Become One Tree And River Of Life

Tree of Life