Bible Articles on the Topic of Rosh

The following articles have been compiled and indexed by inWORD Bible software.

Russia in the Bible?

Our attention is centered upon Ezekiel 38. This chapter, which is often linked with Daniel 11, has been a particular focus for Bible students in all ages. And no wonder, for it is one of the most dramatic chapters in the Bible. It portrays God’s people of Israel gathered back to their own land in the latter days, and then being attacked by a large confederate army led by Gog of the land of Magog. The main invading force comes from the north. The AV says they come from “the north parts”, but more recent translations render this as “far north” or “the recesses of the north” or “uttermost parts of the north”.

Do Ezekiel 38 and Daniel 11 Refer to the Same Events?

A satisfactory and comprehensive understanding of Daniel 11:40-45 has hitherto been prevented owing to the generally accepted idea that this prophecy and that of Ezekiel 38 both refer to the same specified power, time and event; but in the opinion of several students of prophecy, this is by no means the case. In his “Exposition of Daniel,”¹ even Dr. [John] Thomas appears to have experienced some difficulty in reconciling these predictions.

Do Ezekiel 38 and Daniel 11 Refer to the Same Events?

A satisfactory and comprehensive understanding of Daniel 11:40-45 has hitherto been prevented owing to the generally accepted idea that this prophecy and that of Ezekiel 38 both refer to the same specified power, time and event; but in the opinion of several students of prophecy, this is by no means the case. In his “Exposition of Daniel,”¹ even Dr. [John] Thomas appears to have experienced some difficulty in reconciling these predictions.

Gog of the Land of Magog

“Gog of the land of Magog.” Such is the descriptive name given by the inspired prophet to the leader of the great Northern host which will invade Palestine in the latter days.¹

Further Notes on Gog of the Land of Magog

We are grateful to our good friend R. Overton for the following extracts from “The Geographical System of Herodotus” written in 1830 by Major James Rennell, Surveyor-General in Bengal.

Or Perhaps “the Prince of Rosh"

Being an adherent of the “Russian” view of Ezekiel chapters 38 and 39, I would like to give my reasons for accepting the rendering of the Hebrew word “Rosh” of ch. 38:2 and 39:1 as a proper name. It is quite true that Jerome, in his Latin Version of the 3rd century A.D. translates that word by “capitis” (“chief”). But, as Dr. [John] Thomas remarks,¹ Jerome did not feel authorised to reject altogether the idea that it was a proper name; and therefore he inserts, after “capitis,” the bracketed words (“sive Rosh”), “or perhaps Rosh”.

Rosh

(Ezekiel 38:2, 3; 39:1) is rendered “chief” in the Authorized Version. It is left untranslated as a proper name in the Revised Version. Some have supposed that the Russians are here meant, as one of the three Scythian tribes of whom Magog was the prince. They invaded the land of Judah in the days of Josiah. Herodotus, the Greek historian, says: “For twenty-eight years the Scythians ruled over Asia, and things were turned upside down by their violence and contempt.” (See BETHSHEAN.)

Head

hed (רֹאשׁ, rō'sh, Aramaic, רֵאשׁ, rē'sh, and in special sense גּלגּלת, gulgōleth, literally, “skull,” “cut-off head” (1 Chronicles 10:10), whence Golgotha (Matthew 27:33; Mark 15:22; John 19:17); מראשׁה, mera'ăshāh, literally, “head-rest,” “pillow,” “bolster” (1 Kings 19:6); קדקד, ḳodhḳōdh, literally, crown of the head (Deuteronomy 28:35; 33:16, 33:20; 2 Samuel 14:25; Isaiah 3:17; Jeremiah 48:45); בּרזל, barzel, “the head of an axe” (Deuteronomy 19:5, the Revised Version margin “iron”; 2 Kings 6:5); להבה, lehābhāh, להבת, lahebheth, “the head of a spear” (1 Samuel 17:7); κεφαλή, kephalḗ): The first-mentioned Hebrew word and its Aramaic form are found frequently in their literal as well as metaphorical sense. We may distinguish the following meanings:

Rosh (1)

rosh, rōsh (ראשׁ, rō'sh): A son or grandson of Benjamin (Genesis 46:21).

Rosh (2)

(ראשׁ, rō'sh; Ῥώς, Rhṓs, variant (Q margin) κεφαλῆς, kephalḗs; Vulgate (Jerome’s Latin Bible, 390-405 A.D.) capiris):

Rosh

Rosh, (Heb. Rosh, ראֹשׁ, head, as often; Sept. ῾Ρώς), the name of a man and perhaps of a people. SEE GALL.