Bible Articles on the Topic of Peters denial

The following articles have been compiled and indexed by inWORD Bible software.

Subtle Allusions

The Septuagint helps in the tracing of Old Testament allusions which otherwise it would be almost impossible to detect. There is lovely allusiveness of this kind ... in Christ’s warning to Peter on the night of his betrayal:

Peter’s Protestation

Matthew and Mark narrate the Lord’s announcement to Peter that be would deny Him, as if it took place after they had left the supper room, and were upon their way to the Mount of Olives; Luke and John, as taking place before they had left the room. Hence, some suppose that the announcement was made before they left it, and was renewed by the way; and that His declaration respecting the crowing of the cock was twice spoken: once in the room of the supper, as recorded by Luke and John, and once after they had left it, as recorded by Matthew and Mark.¹ Others, however, who agree with these that Jesus twice uttered the prediction respecting the denials of Peter, would identify Matthew, Mark, and Luke; but the last not narrating in chronological order. (See Edersheim, ii. 534, who seems to say that John and the Synoptists all refer to the same warning, and that on the way to Gethsemane.) This identification is defended on internal grounds, and especially that the Lord’s words to Peter, as given by Luke, “When thou art converted, strengthen thy brethren,” seem plainly to point to His words respecting all the apostles, as given by Matthew and Mark, “All ye shall be offended because of me this night.”² That the prediction respecting Peter’s denials was twice spoken, first at the paschal supper and then as they went to Gethsemane (so Lightfoot, Patritius, Townsend), is intrinsically probable, and wholly in accordance with Peter’s character. Jesus had said (John 13:33) that He must go whither His disciples could not follow Him. This leads Peter to ask whither He was going, and why he could not now follow Him; and he adds: “I will lay down my life for thy sake.” Now the Lord declares to him that ere the cock crow, he shall deny Him thrice. (Keil thinks this warning of Peter was put by John in the supper room, because it could not well be inserted later between chapters 17 and 18.) Later, perhaps as they were approaching the garden of Gethsemane, Jesus, addressing them as a body, declares that “they all shall be offended in Him this night” (Matthew 26:31). This leads Peter to repeat his protestations of fidelity, and to affirm that though all others should be offended, yet he would not. The Lord therefore repeats, and more emphatically: “Verily I say unto thee, this day, even in this night, before the cock crow twice, thou shalt deny me thrice” (Mark 14:30).

Peter’s Denials

A certain mystery surrounds one of the apostles at the time of the arrest of Jesus. Whereas the synoptists emphasize that Peter “followed afar off” after recovering from his first panic, “another disciple went in with Jesus.”

Jesus Is Tried by Caiaphas, Peter Denies Knowing Him

After his arrest, Jesus is brought before Caiaphas and the chief priests. Jesus is ultimately found guilty of blasphemy and judged worthy of death. Peter denies knowing Jesus and weeps bitterly. Based upon the Gospel of Matthew, chapter 26, verses 57-75.

The Bible is Embarrassing

Nobody likes to admit it when they’re wrong. The idea of hiding our flaws, wrong-doings, and embarrassments is a characteristic of human nature that’s been around for a very long time. And yet the Bible is full of stories and accounts that often put key biblical characters in awkward and embarrassing positions, made available for all to read.

Open Bible Stories: Jesus Is Put on Trial

It was now the middle of the night. The soldiers led Jesus to thehouse of the high priest in order for the high priest to questionhim. Peter followed far behind them. When Jesus was taken intothe house, Peter stayed outside and warmed himself by a fire.

And He Went Outside and Wept Bitterly

Peters denial

And Peter Remembered

Peters denial

The Cock

Peters denial

The Cock Crowed

Peters denial

The Denial of Saint Peter (1622 oil on canvas)

Peters denial

The Denial of Saint Peter (ca. 1610 oil on canvas)

Peters denial

Denial of Saint Peter (ca. 17th century oil on canvas)

Peters denial

Denying the Hand of Jesus

Peters denial

Die Verleugnung des Petrus (1960 lithograph)

Peters denial

The First Denial of Saint Peter

Peters denial

Immediately a Rooster Crowed

Peters denial

I Don’t Know Him

Peters denial

O Remorso de Pedro

Peters denial

Peter’s Denial (1865 oil on copper plate)

Peters denial

Peter’s Denial (1882)

Peters denial

Peter’s Denial (after Carl Heinrich Bloch)

Peters denial

Peter’s Denial

Peters denial

Peter’s Denial

Peters denial

Peter’s Denial

Peters denial

Peter’s Denial

Peters denial

Peter’s Denial

Peters denial

Peter’s Denial

Peters denial

Peter and the Rooster

Peters denial

Peter Denies Jesus

Peters denial

Peter Denies Jesus

Peters denial

Peter Denies Jesus

Peters denial

Peter Denies Jesus

Peters denial

Peter Denies Jesus and Rooster Crows

Peters denial

Peter Denies Jesus and Rooster Crows

Peters denial

Peter Denies Knowing Jesus

Peters denial

The Second Denial of Saint Peter

Peters denial

The Sorrow of Saint Peter

Peters denial

St. Peter’s Denial

Peters denial

St. Peter with crowing cock (pencil)

Peters denial

The Third Denial of Peter

Peters denial

Denial of Peter

The Denial of Peter (or Peter’s Denial) refers to three acts of denial of Jesus by the Apostle Peter as described in all four Gospels of the New Testament.