Bible Articles on the Topic of Pentecost

The following articles have been compiled and indexed by inWORD Bible software.

Gift of Holy Spirit

Can we determine exactly what was the “gift of the Holy Spirit” outside of the context of these verses (Acts 2:38,39)? Or should we read the whole context for the best picture? Undoubtedly the latter.

Speaking In Tongues: Self-Suggestive Hypnotism?

Can we know what physically happens in the modern-day Pentecostal experience of talking in a tongue? There is evidence, which we will come to later, that there is often some degree of faking. But it cannot be all a hoax — they cannot be all faking? With the great majority, as in the case of Pat Boone, something really happens. A good illustration to begin with, is the testimony, back in the 1960s, of a [brother] who was brought up in a Pentecostal atmosphere before he [left]. He wrote:

Is Pentecost Happening Today — (Part 2)

Since penning the opening article in this series, considerably more evidence has come to hand of the great upsurge in Roman Catholic circles of claims to have the gift of tongue-speaking. One Catholic paper has reported.¹

Is Pentecost Happening Today?

It is the conviction of the present writer that the broad, general answer is a clear—“No”. Those communities which claim the name “Pentecostal” are far removed from the communities pictured in the Acts of the Apostles and letters of Paul. It is easy to dismiss the matter from the mind, perhaps indulge in a little scoffing, and leave the matter there. But the easy way is not the right way. The right way demands that we know something about this problem, because it is a major problem; and if we are to witness the truth of the Gospel effectively, we must become far more aware of the problems which are generated by the “cult” of tongue-speaking which is sweeping through much of the religious world.

606 New Commandments

On Shavuot we received the Torah, which contains 613 commandments. The entire world had already been given seven of these commandments to observe, so we actually received 606 additional commandments. Ruth was the daughter of the king of Moab (Sotah 47a); when she converted to Judaism, she accepted upon herself 606 new commandments as the Jewish people did at Sinai. To emphasize the fact that we all received 606 new commandments on Shavuot [The Feast of Weeks/Pentecost], we read the story of Ruth, whose name has the numerical value of 606.

Drinking Milk on Pentecost

Question: Why is it customary to eat a dairy meal the first day of Shavuot [The Feast of Weeks/Pentecost]?

Biblical Pilgrimage Festivals and Major Feast Days

Three agriculture-related pilgrimage festivals are mandated in Exodus 23:14-17: a seven-day springtime festival of Unleavened Bread, around the barley harvest; an early summer festival of Harvest, when the wheat ripens; and an autumn festival of Ingathering, when olives, grapes, and other fruits are harvested (cf. Exodus 34:18-23).

The Gift of Tongues: Two Schools of Thought

E. S. writes: There seem to be two schools of thought regarding the phenomenon in the 1st century church called in the New Testament the Gift of Tongues. One is that in every case the gift was the capacity to speak in another language. Adherents to this view base their arguments mainly on the narrative of Acts 2 concerning the outpouring of the Spirit on the Day of Pentecost.

The Law Given Through Moses: The Feast of Weeks

The second of the three great celebrations ordered by the Law was the Feast of Weeks. This was really the harvest festival, not a prolonged break from work but a sustained recognition of God as the Giver of all good. Again we feel compelled to recognise that there was a hidden meaning, a ritual prophecy of things to come in the single sheaf of the first-fruits and the two loaves presented at the end of harvest.

Ten Thousand Words in an Unknown Tongue

After ten minutes of the singing of spiritual songs, mainly repetitions of the name of Jesus interspersed with “Alleluia”, “My Redeemer”, “How I love him!”, the large assembly in the marquee fell silent. Then, from somewhere in the company a woman’s voice was heard proclaiming, rhythmically almost as if it were verse, with the accent on the penultimate syllable:

Speaking in Tongues

An ABC investigative report on the phenomena of tongues (or glossolalia) in the Pentecostal Charismatic movement in the United States with parishioner interviews from the congregation of the Randy and Paula White ministries.

What is Speaking in Tongues?

Pentecostalism has a particular focus on faith healing and speaking in tongues. ABC News Online goes behind the scenes to see what’s involved.

Glossolalia: The Science of Speaking in Tongues

Dr. Indre Viskontas speaks with young members of the Freedom Valley Worship Center in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania about their first experiences of speaking in tongues. Next, Paul De Lacy, Associate Professor of Linguistics at Rutgers University, speaks with Indre about the language of speaking in tongues.

What is Speaking in Tongues?

So what does the Bible really say about speaking in tongues? Nathan Busenitz, Assistant Professor of Theology at The Master’s Seminary, explains in the latest edition of “Ask a Professor.”

The Shocking Truth About the Gift of Speaking in Tongues

What does the Bible teach about this gift of speaking in tongues? This video addresses the touchy subject of speaking in tongues. What is the gift of tongues? What are some misconceptions of tongues? How should it be used in the church?

Ex-Christian Answers “What’s Up with Speaking in Tongues?"

Lee, an ex-Pentecostal Christian, regularly answers questions about Christianity, and in this episode, addresses questions concerning the practice of speaking in tongues. Forced by her mother at an early age to speak in tongues, Lee provides some insights into this trademark of Pentecostalism.

Speaking in Tongues: Alternative Voices in Faith

Those Christians who speak in tongues say they don’t care at all about what others think. What matters most for them is that they believe that God is speaking through them. Their experience, also known as “glossolalia,” is their unique connection to God, they say, in a language He understands, even if they don’t.

Solving the Samaritan Riddle

What is the “baptism of the Holy Spirit,” and when and how does a Christian obtain it? Is it received in the holy sacrament of Confirmation? Is it a second blessing which is always evidenced by the gift of speaking in tongues? Or is this something every Christian gets automatically when she believes?

What If You Used to Speak in Tongues?

Listen to a first person testimony on how she used to speak in tongues.

Pentecost

I.e., “fiftieth,” found only in the New Testament (Acts 2:1; 20:16; 1 Corinthians 16:8). The festival so named is first spoken of in Exodus 23:16 as “the feast of harvest,” and again in Exodus 34:22 as “the day of the firstfruits” (Numbers 28:26). From the sixteenth of the month of Nisan (the second day of the Passover), seven complete weeks, i.e., forty-nine days, were to be reckoned, and this feast was held on the fiftieth day. The manner in which it was to be kept is described in Leviticus 23:15-19; Numbers 28:27-29. Besides the sacrifices prescribed for the occasion, every one was to bring to the Lord his “tribute of a free-will offering” (Deuteronomy 16:9-11). The purpose of this feast was to commemorate the completion of the grain harvest. Its distinguishing feature was the offering of “two leavened loaves” made from the new corn of the completed harvest, which, with two lambs, were waved before the Lord as a thank offering.

Pentecost

pen ́tḗ-kost.

Pentecost

Pen’tecost, (Πεντηκοστή, scil. ἡμέρα), the second of the three great annual festivals on which all the males were required to appear before the Lord in the national sanctuary, the other two being the feasts of Passover and Tabernacles. It fell in due course on the sixth day of Sivan, and its rites, according to the Law, were restricted to a single day. The most important passages relating to it are Exodus 23:16; Leviticus 23:15-22; Numbers 28:26-31; Deuteronomy 16:9-12; The following article treats of its observance from a Scriptural as well as Talmudical point of view. SEE FESTIVAL.

Whitsunday

Whitsunday, a festival of the Christian Church commemorative of the descent of the Holy Ghost upon the apostles, as “they were all assembled together with one accord in one place,” on the day of Pentecost (q.v.), from which fact the name Pentecost is sometimes used instead of Whitsunday. Blunt says (Dict. of Doct. and Hist. Theol.), “The etymology of the term has been strangely confused. It has been derived (a) from White Sunday, in supposed allusion to the white garments of the neophytes, as Whitsuntide was one of the two chief seasons for baptism; and (b) from Wytsonday, i.e., Wit, or Wisdom, Sunday, in reference to the outpouring of wisdom upon the apostles. But the real White Sunday is the octave of Easter, or Dominica in albis, and both of these derivations must be abandoned when the proper use of the title is considered. It is not Whit Sunday, but Whitsun Day, as Easter is Easter Day; and the week is Whitsun Week, not Whit Week; and the season Whitsuntide, not Whittide. In Yorkshire, and doubtless also in other parts of England, the feast is commonly called Whissun Day, the accent being strongly thrown on the first syllable; and the two days following, Whissun Monday and Whissun Tuesday. The name is thus derived, as Dr. Neale shows (Essays on Liturgiology, etc.), directly from Pentecost, passing, by various corruptions, Pingsten, Whingsten, into the German Pfingsten and the English Whitsun. The Germans have also their Pfingsten-Woche, in exact correspondence to our Whitsun Week.”

Bible Journey Calendar

Pentecost

Biblical Jewish Feast and Festivals

Pentecost

Biblicons: Pentecost

Pentecost

The Coming of the Holy Spirit

Pentecost

Day of Pentecost (17th c. engraving)

Pentecost

Day of Pentecost (mural)

Pentecost

Day of Pentecost

Pentecost

Gift of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost

Pentecost

Holy Spirit Coming

Pentecost

Jewish Festivals

Pentecost

The Last Days

Pentecost

Matan Torah and the Feast of Shavuot

Pentecost

Pentacosta

Pentecost

Pentacosta

Pentecost

Pentecost (1477 woodcut)

Pentecost

Pentecost (16th c. woodcut)

Pentecost

Pentecost (1909)

Pentecost

Pentecost (1965)

Pentecost

Pentecost (1966)

Pentecost

Pentecost (1979)

Pentecost

Pentecost (ca. 1600 oil on canvas)

Pentecost

The Pentecost (ca. 1613 oil on canvas)

Pentecost

Pentecost (from The Small Passion)

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

The Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

Pentecost

The Pouring Spirit

Pentecost

Counting of the Omer

Counting of the Omer (Hebrew: ספירת העומר, Sefirat HaOmer, sometimes abbreviated as Sefira or the Omer) is an important verbal counting of each of the forty-nine days between the Jewish holidays of Passover and Shavuot as stated in the Hebrew Bible: Leviticus 23:15–16.

Glossolalia

Glossolalia or speaking in tongues, according to linguists, is the fluid vocalizing of speech-like syllables that lack any readily comprehended meaning, in some cases as part of religious practice in which it is believed to be a divine language unknown to the speaker. The term derives from glōssais lalō, a Greek phrase used in the New Testament meaning “speak in, with, or by tongues [i.e., other languages]” (1 Corinthians 14:18). The related term “xenolalia” or “xenoglossy” is used to describe the phenomenon when the language being spoken is a natural language previously unknown to the speaker. Glossolalia is practiced in Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity as well as in other religions.

Jewish holidays

Jewish holidays, also known as Jewish festivals or Yamim Tovim ( ימים טובים, “Good Days,” or singular יום טוב Yom Tov, in transliterated Hebrew [English /ˈjɔːm ˈtɔːv, joʊm ˈtoʊv/]), are holidays observed in Judaism and by Jews throughout the Hebrew calendar and include religious, cultural and national elements, derived from three sources: Biblical mitzvot (“commandments”); rabbinic mandates; Jewish history and the history of the State of Israel.

Pentecost

The Christian holiday of Pentecost (Ancient Greek: Πεντηκοστή [ἡμέρα], Pentēkostē [hēmera], “[the] fiftieth [day]”) is celebrated 50 (101-51) days from Easter Sunday, counting inclusive of Easter Sunday itself, i. e. 49 days or 7 weeks after Easter Sunday. Therefore it always occurs on a Sunday. It is also the tenth day after Ascension Thursday, which itself is 40 days from Easter, counting inclusive of Easter Sunday itself.

Shavuot

Shavuot (or Shovuos, in Ashkenazi usage; Shavuʿoth in Sephardi and Mizrahi Hebrew (Hebrew: שבועות, lit. “Weeks”), known as the Feast of Weeks in English and as Pentecost (Πεντηκοστή) in Ancient Greek, is a Jewish holiday that occurs on the sixth day of the Hebrew month of Sivan (may fall between 14 May–15 June).

Xenoglossy

Xenoglossy (/ˌziːnəˈglɒsi, ˌzɛ-, -noʊ-/), also written xenoglossia (/ˌziːnəˈglɒsiə, ˌzɛ-, -noʊ-/), sometimes also known as xenolalia, is the putative paranormal phenomenon in which a person is able to speak or write a language he or she could not have acquired by natural means. The words derive from Greek ξένος (xenos), “foreigner” and γλῶσσα (glōssa), “tongue” or “language”. The term xenoglossy was ostensibly coined by French parapsychologist Charles Richet. Stories of xenoglossy are found in the Bible, and contemporary claims of xenoglossy have been made by parapsychologists and reincarnation researchers such as Ian Stevenson. There is no scientific evidence that xenoglossy is an actual phenomenon.