Bible Articles on the Topic of Paradise

The following articles have been compiled and indexed by inWORD Bible software.

New Testament Punctuation

The Greek language has a system of punctuation marks somewhat similar to ours. Originally, this was not so; there was no punctuation, and moreover, the writing was not separated into words. (“The oldest Greek manuscripts had no chapter and verse divisions, no punctuation marks and hence no separation into sentences, and not even any separation between words. All they have are line after line, column after column, page after page, through a whole book of the NT.”)¹

Bible Basics: The Thief On The Cross

The thief “said unto Jesus, Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy Kingdom. And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, Today shalt thou be with me in paradise,” (Luke 23:42-43). These verses are taken to mean that baptism is not essential for salvation, and that we go straight to Heaven at death. Apart from all the other evidence to the contrary, a closer reading of the passage reveals the following:

Paradise the Two Trees After the Exile

Paradise literally means “a park,” “a pleasure ground”. The Genesis story, Chapter 1, brings before us just such a “Paradise” as set up in “The Garden of Eden”. We are told that it was a garden of trees, for food, set there for the first created man and woman, Adam and Eve. In the midst of the Garden grew two special and very important trees;

Some Difficult Passages: The Thief On The Cross

And he said unto Jesus, Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy kingdom. And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, Today shalt thou be with me in paradise. (Luke 23:42-43)

The Great Salvation: In or Out of the Body

And I know that this man was caught up into Paradise—whether in the body or out of the body I do not know, God knows (2 Corinthians 12:3)

The Great Salvation: The Thief on the Cross

When the fact that the Scriptures teach the unconsciousness of man in death is shown to those who believe in the immortality of the soul, they generally ask, “What about the thief on the cross?” On account of their preconceived idea of heaven going at death they conclude, without investigation, that the words, “Verily I say unto thee to-day, thou shalt thou be with me in paradise,’’ (Luke 23:43) mean that that very day the thief would be with Christ in heaven.

Church of England Panel: Remove Brimstone from Idea of Hell

LONDON — A Church of England commission [on doctrine] has rejected the idea of hell as a place of fire, pitchforks and screams of unending agony, describing it instead as annihilation for all who reject the love of God.

The Third Heaven

The great apostle Paul, Christ’s “chosen vessel” to bear his name before the Gentiles, was honoured and enlightened by the Lord with wonderful visions and revelations. One of these he records thus: “I knew a man in Christ.... (whether in the body, I know not; or whether out of the body, I know not; God knoweth), how that he was caught up into paradise, and heard unspeakable words, which it is not lawful for a man to utter. On behalf of such a man will I glory.”¹ The experience was so real that Paul could not determine whether he was actually present or in vision. He heard words unspeakable and “not lawful” for him to repeat in his ministry.

Paradise: Which Heaven?

Our colleague A.E.J. passes forward an item which may be of interest to readers of this section. It was intended, in the first place, as a footnote or postscript to the article by T. Royce entitled “The Third Heaven,” which appeared on p. 308 of the October issue, but was too late for inclusion.

Shalt Thou be With Me in Paradise?

The above words are taken from Luke 23:43, but the added question mark is the writer’s. It has always seemed that there has been something wanting in the generally accepted explanation of this incident, and this article is the result of much thought and the collation of opinions of a number of others.

Conditional Immortality: What It Means and Why It's the Best Label

Alas! The hell debate has a terminology problem. First, traditionalism is nondescript and sometimes considered pejorative. It’s also not quite accurate: there were several traditions in early Christendom, with eternal torment dominating in the Western church from around the fourth century. Next, universalism can refer to the inclusivist outlook on world religions, which evangelical universalists typically deny in favor of an eternal opportunity to respond to the gospel. Finally, conditionalism (short for Conditional Immortality) is sometimes reduced to a view about the mechanics of human mortality/immortality instead of pertaining to ultimate destinies in the context of eschatology.

The Thief on the Cross

At a time during the long drawn-out hours of pain, thirst and misery, when by jeers and taunts priests, people and Roman soldiers seemed bent on adding as much as they could to the sufferings of Jesus, there came marvellous help and encouragement from an altogether unexpected source. What was it that turned the thief at Jesus’ right hand from curses and blasphemy to the utterance of a matchless confession of faith? The gospels offer no explanation, nor do the commentators. It is ground for thankfulness that the fact is recorded.

The Fallacy of Accent

The fallacy of accent is employed whenever an emphasis is placed on a written or spoken communication in a way that materially alters its original or intended meaning. To interpret any piece of literature logically, one must be sensitive to the context and original meaning intended by the author and not alter that meaning by misplaced emphasis. This can be done quite subtly. Without changing a word, a piece of written material can be made to say something entirely different than what was intended by the author. A common form of this fallacy is the altering of punctuation, which is particularly significant for biblical research because the original text of Scripture contained no punctuation marks. For instance, the addition of a comma can dramatically alter the simple sentence, “God made man,” (as in God created man) to “God, made man” (as in God became man). What a big difference!

Eve Saw the Serpent Eat the Fruit and Live

Our attempt in the January Testimony to explain in simple terms the temptation of our first parents in Eden is freely criticized by an Australian reader, A.R.D.M. He writes: You endow the serpent with “human” intelligence. That, to me, is contrary to Scripture, and is far too superficial, and subject to ridicule. You will certainly say that the Scriptural record plainly states that the serpent and Eve “spoke” to each other, but that does not necessarily mean that the dialogue between them was literal, any more than the record in 2 Kings 14:9 about the “thistle” and the “cedar.”

Why I Am An Annihilationist

I am an annihilationist. That means I think the Bible teaches annihilationism. Annihilationism is the view that eternal life is the gift of God, and that those who do not receive this gift will not live forever. Stated more negatively, annihilationists deny the more popular Christian claim that the Bible teaches the traditional doctrine of eternal torment in hell, and we affirm instead that the Bible teaches that the lost will one day die forever. It is important to realize then that annihilationism is not simply a denial that the Bible teaches eternal punishment. Rather, it is a particular view of what that punishment will consist of.

In the Beginning (2013)

This short film by independent film director Bryce Ury wowed the audience at the Highbridge Film Festival in 2013 with a depiction of Adam and Eve and their search for hope after the fall. This film won Audience Favorite and Best Drama.

Paradise

Paradise (Persian: پردیس, Paradise garden) is the term for a place of timeless harmony. The Abrahamic faiths associate paradise with the Garden of Eden, that is, the perfect state of the world prior to the fall from grace, and the perfect state that will be restored in the World to Come.

Wrested Scriptures: Without a Body (2 Corinthians 12:2-4)

“Caught up to the third heaven . . . caught up into paradise, and heard unspeakable words, which it is not lawful for a man to utter.”

Wrested Scriptures: The Thief's Request (Luke 23:43)

“And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee To day shalt thou be with me in paradise.”

Hell, Hades, Tartarus, Gehenna and Paradise

There is much confusion and misunderstanding over the word “hell.” This audio lecture provides an introduction to the meaning of hell and several related key words pertaining to the afterlife and future judgment.

A Final Word With Edward Fudge

Edward Fudge, author of The Fire That Consumes, joins RethinkingHell.com contributor Chris Date in a two-part interview to discuss his story, the recent movie that tells it, and his latest and final book on the topic of final punishment, Hell: A Final Word.

The Goodness of God with John Stackhouse

Dr. John Stackhouse, Jr., Sangwoo Youtong Chee Professor of Theology and Culture at Regent College, Vancouver, Canada, joins RethinkingHell.com contributor Chris Date to discuss his switch from traditionalism (the view that the wicked will be tormented forever) to that of conditionalism (the view that the second death is a literal cessation of consciousness and life). Along the way, Dr. Stackhouse talks about his lecture, “Hell and the Goodness of God.” and whether the challenge to the traditional view of hell is part of a reformation that is going on within Christianity today.

The Case for Annihilationism

Listen to Dr. Glenn Peoples make a positive case for annihilationism.

Erasing Hell with Preston Sprinkle

Dr. Preston Sprinkle, co-author of Erasing Hell with Francis Chan, discusses why, having leaned toward the traditional view of hell when the book was published, now finds himself leaning toward conditionalism. Although now leaning toward conditionalism (the view that the second death is a literal cessation of consciousness and life), a few passages still give him pause—which are discussed and considered in this 2-part dialog with Rethinking Hell’s contributor, Chris Date.

Traditional Objections to Conditional Immortality Answered

An evangelical Christian attempts to persuade his fellow evangelicals to rethink the traditional view of hell. In this Rethinking Hell podcast, Chris Date looks at the most frequently cited Bible passages traditionalists use to support their view, and answers the most commonly held traditional objections to conditional immortality and the final annihilation of the unsaved. Chris also shines a spotlight on some of the extra-Biblical arguments that traditionalists put forward, revealing how little traditionalists have to stand on.

The Worms of Hell: A Dispensational Challenge

Part 2 of a discussion between Rethinking Hell’s host Chris Date and guest Dr. Robert Taylor, author of Rescue From Death: John 3:16 Salvation. Their discussion addressed differences among conditionalists (those who believe in conditional immortality) and why consistent Dispensationalists must believe in the annihilation of the unsaved. In the following audio portion, Dr. Taylor looks specifically looks at why Isaiah 66:24 needs to be taken literally and historically and not divorced from its context.

The Traditionalist Fallacies of Suffering in Matthew’s Everlasting Punishment

Part 2 of a discussion between Rethinking Hell’s host Chris Date and guest Dr. Robert Taylor, author of Rescue From Death: John 3:16 Salvation. Their discussion looked at the topic of conditional immortality, and in the following audio portion, Dr. Taylor looked specifically at the “eternal punishment” described in Matthew 25:46. He notes that:

Heaven is Not My Home

This world is not my home I’m just a passing throughMy treasures are laid up somewhere beyond the blueThe angels beckon me from heaven’s open doorAnd I can’t feel at home in this world anymoreOh lord you know I have no friend like youIf heaven’s not my home then lord what will I doThe angels beckon me from heaven’s open doorAnd I can’t feel at home in this world anymore

Stewarding the Earth

This episode begins a new series on the topic of stewardship. To start with, we’ll discuss the biblical mindset towards stewarding the earth. Future episodes will address stewarding our bodies and finances.

The Sleep of the Dead

What happens when you die? Is there an intermediate state? What does the Bible teach about the dead before resurrection? These questions are important for our study of the kingdom of God. If you go straight to heaven when you die, you’re not going to care very much about what happens when Jesus returns. You may find it marginally interesting, but it’s what’s next for you. In this way, the doctrine of heaven-at-death eclipses Jesus’ gospel of the kingdom. However, as it turns out, the Bible teaches that the dead are asleep until the resurrection on the last day. In this lecture you’ll learn the primary texts that support conditional immortality and you’ll see how this Hebrew notion compares to what other cultures and religions say about the intermediate state and afterlife.

Paradise

A Persian word (pardes), properly meaning a “pleasure-ground” or “park” or “king’s garden.” (See EDEN.) It came in course of time to be used as a name for the age to come (Luke 23:43; 2 Corinthians 12:4; Revelation 2:7). For “garden” in Genesis 2:8 the Septuagint has “paradise.”

Garden

gar ́d'n (גּן, gan, גּנּה, gannāh, גּנּה, ginnāh; κῆπος, kḗpos): The Arabic jannah (diminutive, jannainah), like the Hebrew gannāh, literally, “a covered or hidden place,” denotes in the mind of the dweller in the East something more than the ordinary garden. Gardens in Biblical times, such as are frequently referred to in Semitic literature, were usually walled enclosures, as the name indicates (Lamentations 2:6 the American Revised Version, margin), in which there were paths winding in and out among shade and fruit trees, canals of running water, fountains, sweet-smelling herbs, aromatic blossoms and convenient arbors in which to sit and enjoy the effect. These gardens are mentioned in Genesis 2 and 3; Genesis 13:10; Song of Solomon 4:12-16; Ecclesiastes 2:5, 2:6; Ezekiel 28:13; 31:8, 31:9; 36:35; Joel 2:3. Ancient Babylonian, Assyrian and Egyptian records show the fondness of the rulers of these countries for gardens laid out on a grand scale and planted with the rarest trees and plants. The drawings made by the ancients of their gardens leave no doubt about their general features and their correspondence with Biblical gardens. The Persian word pardeṣ (παράδεισος, parádeisos) appears in the later Hebrew writings to denote more extensive gardens or parks. It is translated “orchards” in Ecclesiastes 2:5 the King James Version; Song of Solomon 4:13. See PARADISE.

New Heavens; New Earth

The formal conception of new heavens and a new earth occurs in Isaiah 65:17; 66:22; 2 Peter 3:13; Revelation 21:1 (where “heaven,” singular). The idea in substance is also found in Isaiah 51:16; Matthew 19:28; 2 Corinthians 5:17; Hebrews 12:26-28. In each case the reference is eschatological, indeed the adjective “new” seems to have acquired in this and other connections a semi-technical eschatological sense. It must be remembered that the Old Testament has no single word for “universe,” and that the phrase “heaven and earth” serves to supply the deficiency. The promise of a new heavens and a new earth is therefore equivalent to a promise of world renewal.

Paradise

par ́a-dīs (פּרדּס, pardēṣ; παράδεισος, parádeisos):

Park

park (פּרדּס, pardēṣ; Septuagint παράδεισος, parádeisos; compare Arabic firdaus): “I made me gardens and parks,” the King James Version “orchards” (Ecclesiastes 2:5); “Asaph the keeper of the king’s forest,” the Revised Version margin “park” (Nehemiah 2:8). The same word occurs in Song of Solomon 4:13, “Thy shoots are an orchard (the Revised Version margin “paradise”) of pomegranates.” according to Liddell and Scott, paradeisos occurs first in Xenophon, who always uses it of the parks of Persian kings and noblemen. Like many other quadriliterals the word is undoubtedly of eastern origin. It seems to connote an enclosure. It is used in Septuagint of the Garden of Eden. Compare Luke 23:43; 2 Corinthians 12:4; Revelation 2:7. See PARADISE.

Paradise

The word “paradise” is probably of Persian origin. It occurs but three times in the Old Testament, namely, in Song of Solomon 4:13, Ecclesiastes 2:5, and Nehemiah 2:8. In the first of these passages it means “garden”; in the second and third, “park.” In the apocalypses and in the Talmud the word is used of the Garden of Eden and its heavenly prototype (comp. references in Weber’s “Jüdische Theologie,” 2d ed., 1897, pp. 344 et seq.).

Paradise (3)

There have been at least four notable attempts in very recent times to discover this long-sought locality; two of them by American, and two by German authors. Their theories have been put forth with the greatest assurance, and in most cases supported by a vast array of learning; but they all seem to. have failed to satisfy the judgment of the literary world, or to add anything substantial towards a reasonable solution of the question.

Paradise

Paradise is but an Anglicized form of the Greek word παράδεισος, which is identical with the Sanscrit paradesa, Persian pardes, and appears also in the Hebrew pardes, פִּרדֵּס, and the Arabic firdarus. In all these languages it has essentially the same meaning, a park. It does not occur in the Old Testament, in the English version, but is used in the Sept. to translate the Hebrew gân, גָּן, a garden (Genesis 2:8 sq.), and thence found its way into the New Testament, where it is applied figuratively to the celestial dwelling of the righteous, in allusion to the Garden of Eden (2 Corinthians 12:4; Revelation 2:7). It has thus come into familiar use to denote both that garden and the heaven of the just. SEE EDEN.

Tree of Life

Whatever may have been the frame and texture of Adam’s body while in Eden, it is certain that, being “of the earth, it was earthy,” and was thus liable to disease and exposed to decay; just as his soul; at the same time, was liable to the greater evil of temptation by being exposed to the power of the tempter. Hence, while “every tree of the garden was given for food,” the tree of life, in the midst of the garden, was provided by Infinite Wisdom as the appointed antidote of disease or decay of the body while, at the same time, the enjoyment of spiritual life, or the indwelling of the spirit of God, and the right of access to the tree of life, thus securing immortality, were conditioned on our first parents not eating the forbidden fruit of the tree of knowledge (Genesis 2:9-17). The various references to the “tree of life” evidently consider it to have been the divinely appointed medium for securing the immortality of our first parents (Proverbs 3:18; 11:30; Ezekiel 47:12; Revelation 2:7; 22:2,14). See Reineccius, De Arbore Vitae (Weissenf. 1722). SEE LIFE.

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Paradise

Adam

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Adam and Eve’s Temptation (stained glass)

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Adam and Eve (1509 woodcut)

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Adam and Eve (1509 woodcut)

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Adam and Eve (1514 woodcut)

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Adam and Eve (1533)

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Adam and Eve (1585 engraving)

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Adam and Eve (15th c.)

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Adam and Eve (1602 engraving)

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Adam and Eve (16th c. engraving)

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Adam and Eve (1728)

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Adam and Eve (1780)

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Adam and Eve (17th c. engraving)

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Adam and Eve (17th c. intaglio)

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Adam and Eve (1893)

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Adam and Eve (1923)

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Adam and Eve (1981 color stencil)

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Adam and Eve (19th c. oil on canvas)

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Adam and Eve (2004 etching)

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Adam and Eve (2016)

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Adam and Eve (ca. 1465)

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Adam and Eve (ca. 1513)

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Adam and Eve (ca. 1520)

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Adam and Eve (ca. 1639, etching)

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Adam and Eve (copy of Albrecht Durer)

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Adam and Eve (steel drum metal)

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Adam and Eve

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Adam and Eve - The Fall

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Adam and Eve

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Adam and Eve and the Forbidden Fruit (1960 lithograph)

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Adam and Eve and the Forbidden Fruit

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Adam and Eve and the Serpent (ca. 1930)

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Adam and Eve and the Snake in Me (2016)

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Adam and Eve at Creation (paper cutting)

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Adam and Eve Being Expelled from Paradise (ca. 1520)

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Adam and Eve Bible Stories

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Adam and Eve Cast Out of the Garden of Eden

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Adam and Eve Cast Out of the Garden of Eden

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Adam and Eve Cast Out of the Garden of Eden

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Adam and Eve cover their nakedness (ca. 1750 etching)

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Adam and Eve Driven from Eden by an Angel (ca. 1750, etching)

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Adam and Eve Driven Out of Paradise (1805)

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Adam and Eve Driven Out of Paradise (1827 Mezzotint)

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Adam and Eve Driven Out of Paradise (ca. 1765 engraving)

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Adam and Eve Driven Out of Paradise (engraving)

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Adam and Eve driven out of Paradise

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Adam and Eve Expelled from Eden

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Adam and Eve Expelled from Paradise (19th c.)

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Adam and Eve Expulsed from Paradise (ca. 1450 oil on canvas)

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Adam and Eve Hide Themselves (1540 engraving)

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Adam and Eve Hiding from God (17th c. engraving)

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Adam and Eve in Paradise (1600 engraving)

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Adam and Eve in Paradise (ca. 1650)

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Adam and Eve in the Garden

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Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden

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Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden

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Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden

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Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden #1 (tempera)

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Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden #2 (tempera)

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Adam and Eve in the Paradise (1611)

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Adam and Eve I

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Adam and Eve Study

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Adam and Eve Tombstones

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Adam & Eve Watched by an Angel (steel drum metal)

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Adam and Eve with Apples

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Adam and Eve with Apple and Serpent

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Adam and Eve with the Animals (mola)

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Adam and the Animals

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Adam and the Beasts (1802 engraving)

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Adam en Eva (c. 1711)

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Adam et Eve (1955)

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Adam Hearing the Voice of the Almighty (1827 mezzotint)

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Adam in the Garden of Eden

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Adam Is Tempted by Eve (gouache on board)

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Adam Naming the Animals

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Adam Naming the Animals

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Adam und Eva

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Adam, Eve and the Serpent (1977)

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Advanced Temptation

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And the Eyes Were Opened (wood engraving)

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And the Man Did Eat

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The Angel Expelling Adam and Eve from Paradise (16th c., engraving)

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Angel of Paradise

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Angel Sends Adam and Eve Out of Garden

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The Animals Brought Before Adam

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Animal Expulsion

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Apple Green Earth

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Apple of Knowledge

Paradise

Banished from Paradise

Paradise

Be Fruitful and Multiply

Paradise

Biblicae Veteris et Novi Testamenti (17th c. engraving)

Paradise

The Big Story: Adam and Eve

Paradise

The Brusing (sketch)

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The Creation (circa 1600)

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Creation

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Creation of Adam (16th c. engraving)

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The Creation of the World and the Expulsion from Paradise

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Curse of Adam

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Curse of the Serpent

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Das Paradies

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Death Fruit

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Decepta Mulier a Serpente (17th c. print)

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De Zondeval (ca. 1506 engraving)

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The Drinking Loophole

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Driven From Eden (1720 illumination)

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Eden-Cam Disconnect

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Eden (1541)

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Eden Revised

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Elementary Math

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El Jardin del Eden

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Eve’s Shame

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Eve (1896)

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Eve (ca. 1507 oil on panel)

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Eve

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Eve

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Eve and Adam Eating Fruits from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil

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Eve And The Serpent (1907)

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Eve and the Serpent (1965)

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Eve in The Garden of Eden (detail)

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Eve Repentant

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Eve Tempted (c. 1877)

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Eve Tempted

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Eve Tempted by the Serpent (18th c. tempera)

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Eve Tempted by the Serpent

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Eve Tempted by the Serpent

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Eve Tenders the Apple to Adam (17th c. engraving)

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Expelled

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The Explusion

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Expulsion (17th c. engraving)

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The Expulsion

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The Expulsion

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The Expulsion

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Expulsion from Eden.org

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Expulsion from Eden (1583 engraving)

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The Expulsion from Eden (1808, pen and watercolor)

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Expulsion from Eden

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The Expulsion from Paradise (1529 engraving)

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The Expulsion from Paradise (from The Story of Adam and Eve)

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Expulsion from Paradise (Small Passion) (1510 woodcut)

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The Expulsion from Paradise

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The Expulsion from Paradise

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Expulsion from Paradise

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Expulsion from Paradise

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Expulsion from Paradise

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Expulsion from Paradise

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Expulsion from Paradise

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Expulsion from Paradise, from The Fall and Salvation of Mankind Through the Life

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Expulsion from the Garden (1828)

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Expulsion from the Garden

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The Expulsion of Adam and Eve (13th c. illumination detail)

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Expulsion of Adam and Eve (from Paradise Lost)

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Expulsion of Adam and Eve

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The Expulsion of Adam and Eve

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The Expulsion of Adam and Eve from the Garden of Paradise

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The Fall (1720 illumination)

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Fall (linocut)

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The Fall of Adam and Eve (1520)

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Fall of Adam and Eve

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Fall of Man (10th c. illumination on parchment)

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The Fall of Man (1512 woodcut)

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The Fall of Man (1529 engraving)

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The Fall of Man (1616)

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The Fall of Man (16th c. engraving)

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The Fall of Man (16th c. engraving)

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The Fall of Man (Adam and Eve) (1504 engraving)

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The Fall of Man (ca. 1530)

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The Fall of Man (ca. 1570)

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Fall of Man (Farnese Hours, 1546 illumination)

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The Fall of Man (Small Passion) (16th c. woodcut)

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The First Lawyer

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The First Lie

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The Flaming Sword (17th c. print)

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Fleeing the Garden of Eden

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Forbidden Fruit Juice

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The Forbidden Tree

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The Garden

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The Garden of Earthly Delights

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The Garden of Eden (19th c. oil on canvas)

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The Garden of Eden (detail)

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The Garden of Eden

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The Garden of Eden

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Garden of Eden

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The Garden of Eden

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The Garden of Eden

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The Garden of Eden

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The Garden of Eden

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The Garden of Eden

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The Garden of Eden

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Garden of Eden

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The Garden of Eden

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Garden of Eden

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The Garden of Eden with the Fall of Man

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The Generations of the Heavens and of the Earth

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Genesis (18th c. engraving)

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Genesis 1, Paradise

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God’s Curse

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God Confronts Adam and Eve

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God Rebuking Adam and Eve

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God Reprimanding Adam (ca. 1570 oil on canvas)

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In the Garden

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In the Garden

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Izgonvaneot Raja (Expulsion) (2002)

Paradise

Izgonvane (Expulsion)

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I Want My Rib Back

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La Creation (1971)

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Leaving of Paradise (2015)

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Leaving of Paradise

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Lesson Learned

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Losing Paradise

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Man’s Sin, and God’s Promise

Paradise

Man Made in the Image of God

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Neither Shall You Touch It

Paradise

Not Fair

Paradise

Now the Serpent Was More Subtil Than Any Beast

Paradise

No Companion Found for Adam

Paradise

Organic Forbidden Fruit?

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Paradies

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Paradise Landscape (ca. 1628)

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Paradise Lost (1921)

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Paradise Lost

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Paradise Lost

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Paradise with the Approach of the Archangel

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Parashat Berishit (Genesis)

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The Rebuke of Adam and Eve (1740)

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The Rebuke of Adam and Eve

Paradise

The Serpent Tempting Eve (1802)

Paradise

The Serpent Tempts Eve

Paradise

She Started It

Paradise

Snakeskin Outfits

Paradise

Sunsets on Eden (2009)

Paradise

Take, Eat (1720 illumination)

Paradise

Take, Eat

Paradise

The Temptation (1899)

Paradise

Temptation (2016)

Paradise

Temptation

Paradise

Temptation

Paradise

The Temptation and Fall of Eve (1808, pen and watercolor)

Paradise

The Temptation and the Expulsion of Adam and Eve

Paradise

The Temptation in the Garden of Eden (16/17th c. oil)

Paradise

Temptation of Adam (1539 woodcut)

Paradise

The Temptation of Adam (1795)

Paradise

The Temptation of Adam

Paradise

Temptation of Adam and Eve (1640)

Paradise

Temptation of Adam and Eve (1780 engraving)

Paradise

Temptation of Adam and Eve (17th c. earthenware)

Paradise

Temptation of Adam and Eve (ca. 1517)

Paradise

The Temptation of Adam and Eve (from The Story of Adam and Eve)

Paradise

Temptation of Adam and Eve

Paradise

The Temptation of Eve

Paradise

The Temptation of Eve

Paradise

Temptaton and Expulsion of Adam and Eve (15th c.)

Paradise

The Tempting

Paradise

Tempting Eve (1827 Mezzotint)

Paradise

Tentazione di Adamo ed Eva (1424)

Paradise

This Sinless

Paradise

The Tree of Knowledge

Paradise

Trying Something New

Paradise

Try This Appetizer

Paradise

Verloren Paradijs (Expulsion From Paradise) (1893 watercolor)

Paradise

We May Eat

Paradise

What Is This You Have Done?

Paradise

Where Art Thou?

Paradise

Where Was That Billboard Ten Minutes Ago?

Paradise

The Woman, the Man, the Serpent (1911)

Paradise

Garden of Eden

The Garden of Eden (Hebrew גַּן עֵדֶן, Gan ʿEḏen) or often Paradise is the biblical “garden of God,” described most notably in the Book of Genesis chapters 2 and 3, and also in the Book of Ezekiel. The “garden of God,” not called Eden, is mentioned in Genesis 13, and the “trees of the garden” are mentioned in Ezekiel 31. The Book of Zechariah and the Book of Psalms also refer to trees and water in relation to the temple without explicitly mentioning Eden.

Paradise garden

The paradise garden is a form of garden of Old Persian origin. Originally referred to by a single noun signifying “a walled-in compound or garden” from pairi (around) and daeza or diz (wall, brick, or shape), Xenophon translated the Persian phrase pairidaeza into the Greek version Paradeisos. The enclosed garden concept is now often referred to as paradise garden due to additional Indo-European meanings of “paradise.”