Bible Articles on the Topic of Iron and clay

The following articles have been compiled and indexed by inWORD Bible software.

Arab: Mixed?

Question: Who are the “mixed” people described in Daniel 2:41,43?

Iron Legs: Christianity and Islam?

King Nevuchadnetzar of Babylon had a very frightening dream which agitated him greatly. Afterwards, he forgot the details and thus did not know the dream’s interpretation until Daniel told him that he had dreamt of an image whose head was of fine gold, with its breast and arms of silver, its belly and thighs of copper, and its legs of iron — and then all the parts crumbled together.

The Identity Of The Clay

The base on which the great image stood, of which king Nebuchadnezzar dreamed, was made of iron and clay mixed together. This unstable combination has given rise to the proverbial expression, “feet of clay.” Daniel recounted the dream to the king:

The Four World Empires Foretold by the Prophet Daniel

This image’s head was of fine gold. His breast and arms of silver. His body and thighs of brass. His legs of iron, his feet part of iron and part of clay.

Nebuchadnezzar’s Image (Daniel 2)

Because of its very familiarity, the main outline of this remarkable revelation will be treated in relatively brief fashion. Indeed, the only valid reason for spending time on it here is the often-unrecognised fact that certain features of the king’s dream seem traditionally to have been misconstrued.

Nebuchadnezzar’s Image

I would like to answer a number of points concerning Nebuchadnezzar’s image that Brother David Caudery raises (Letters, December 2014, page 535).

Daniel 2

Daniel 2 (the second chapter of the Book of Daniel) tells how Daniel interpreted a dream of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon. The king saw a gigantic statue made of four metals, from its gold head to its feet of mingled iron and clay; as he watched, a stone “not cut by human hands” destroyed the statue and became a mountain filling the whole world. Daniel explained to the king that the statue represented four successive kingdoms beginning with Babylon, while the stone and mountain signified a kingdom established by God which would never be destroyed nor given to another people. (The dream and its interpretation are given in verses 31-45). Nebuchadnezzar then acknowledges the supremacy of Daniel’s God and raises him to high office in Babylon.

Wrested Scriptures: First-Century Kingdom (Daniel 2:4)

“And in the days of these kings shall the God of heaven set up a kingdom, which shall never be destroyed: . . .”

Wrested Scriptures: Fourth Beast Kingdom (Daniel 7:7-9)

“. . . behold a fourth beast, dreadful and terrible, and strong exceedingly; and it had great iron teeth: it devoured and brake in pieces, and stamped the residue with the feet of it: and it was diverse from all the beasts that were before it; and it had ten horns . . . I beheld till the thrones were cast down, and the Ancient of days did sit . . .”

Daniel Interpretation of the Dream Statue

Iron and clay

Daniel Interprets Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream (17th c. engraving)

Iron and clay

Daniel Interprets Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream

Iron and clay

Daniel Interprets Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream

Iron and clay

Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream (image 11 of 12)

Iron and clay

Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream (image 12 of 12)

Iron and clay

Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream (image 1 of 12)

Iron and clay

Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream (image 2 of 12)

Iron and clay

Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream (image 7 of 12)

Iron and clay

Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream: The Composite Statue (France, 15th century)

Iron and clay

Statue of Empires

Iron and clay