Bible Articles on the Topic of Infant sprinkling

The following articles have been compiled and indexed by inWORD Bible software.

Meaning of Baptism

Baptism in faith is our meeting point with the saving death of Jesus Christ without which there is no forgiveness of sins and therefore no hope.

The Vital Importance of Baptism

Several times in earlier Studies we have mentioned the vital importance of baptism; it is the first step of obedience to the Gospel message. Hebrews 6:2 speaks of baptism as one of the most basic doctrines. We have left its consideration until this late stage because true baptism can only occur after a correct grasp of the basic truths which comprise the Gospel. We have now completed our study of these; if you wish to become truly associated with the great hope which the Bible offers through Jesus Christ, then baptism is an absolute necessity.

How Did The Early Christians Baptize?

In the 19th century many scholars denied that immersion was the original mode of baptism.¹ McKay and Rogers wrote influential interpretations of the archaeological evidence,² and Dale’s linguistic study became the standard lexical resource for the anti-immersion position.³

Infant Baptism Through The Centuries

We could find no direct references to the baptism of infants in the second century. There is a statement of Irenaeus that has been taken to refer to the practice, but there is some question that it was so intended. Irenaeus writes: “For he came to save all by means of himself – all, I say, who by him are born again to God – infants, children, adolescents, young men and old men.” From its context, it is doubtful that the writer meant to countenance infant baptism, or that the practice was known to him (Against Heresies, II, xxiv. 4).

Baptism Is One of the Conditions of Salvation

“When the people heard this, they were cut to the heart and said to Peter and the other apostles, ‘Brothers, what shall we do?’” (Acts 2:37)

The Key to Bible Understanding: Baptism

Yes. The one baptism is closely connected with other elements of truth, One Lord, one faith. (Ephesians 4:5)

Baptism, Its Mode And Meaning

There has been very much written on the subject of baptism, perhaps more in an endeavor to evade the force of New Testament teachings than in support of them. The very fact that so much skill has been employed on the negative side of the question is a strong proof of the truth of the affirmative side. One glancing over the New Testament statements, implications and inferences on the subject cannot but be impressed with the boldness, not to say the presumption, of that undertaking which seeks to make the sprinkling of water in the face of a babe or an adult answer the purpose of baptism; nor is it any less surprising that there should be an effort to treat the subject as one of indifference,—as a doctrine which is not a vital part of the plan of salvation.

Code of Justinian: Holy Baptism Not To Be Repeated

The Codex Justinianus (Latin for “The Code of Justinian”) is one part of the Corpus Juris Civilis, the codification of Roman law ordered early in the 6th century AD by Justinian I, who was an Eastern Roman (Byzantine) emperor in Constantinople. Two other units, the Digest and the Institutes, were created during his reign. The fourth part, the Novellae Constitutiones (New Constitutions, or Novels), was compiled unofficially after his death but is now thought of as part of the Corpus Juris Civilis.

The Dawn of Infant Baptism

Baptism is a personal decision and requires personal repentance, obedience from the heart, being taught and persuaded. Peter says baptism is a personal pledge of loyalty to God, a pledge to keep a clear or good conscience toward God. Aristides affirms the innocence of infants.

Belief Before Baptism

Before an infant is baptised (i.e., “christened”), the priest requires three Godparents to testify to their belief in the Apostles’ Creed, and then asks them—in their capacity as sponsors for the child—“Wilt thou (ostensibly the child) be baptised in this faith?” And because the child is much too young to reply, the Godparents are required to say, as from the child, “That is my desire.”

Infant Baptism: An Admitted Departure from the Scripture

In a previous article¹ it has been shown that in the New Testament, insistence is laid on the power of the word of God to produce in an individual that mental awareness of the divine will which is a necessary accompaniment of baptism into the saving name of Jesus. Belief from the heart and confession with the mouth are the premises which are laid down as essential if the act of baptism is to be acceptable to God. From this it follows that the practice of infant baptism fails to conform to the requirements laid down in the Scriptures; yet infant baptism continues to be widely practised among various religious denominations, and the attempt is sometimes made to justify it by reference to certain passages of Scripture. The aim of the present article is to look at some of the reasons advanced for and against infant baptism, and in particular, to endeavour to find the correct interpretation of the Scripture passages commonly cited in its support.

Three Distinct Baptisms?

D.S.A. (Blackpool, England) asks some very interesting questions regarding baptism. He writes: Are there three distinct baptisms spoken of in the New Testament viz.:

The Sacrament of Baptism

There can be no denial of the fact that from the very commencement of the Christian movement, baptism was the initiating rite. John “the Baptist” baptised in anticipation of the coming of the Saviour. The disciples of Jesus baptised at the beginning of his ministry. During it he stressed the importance of baptism, and at the end he commanded its observance in the missionary work that followed his ascension. The apostles carried out this command whenever they made converts, and it became established as a very definite indication of the fidelity of the Christian to the Captain of his salvation.

The Sacraments

When the younger Pliny wrote to the Emperor Trajan about the Christians, he described them as meeting together to bind themselves with a sacramentum.

John’s Baptism

The ideas associated with the baptism which was the central feature of John’s ministry are often vague or quite mistaken, so perhaps it may be worth-while to re-examine the gospels’ teaching about it.

All Your Household, All Your Children: Baptized All?

“The promise is unto you and to your children.” (Acts 2:39)

Baptism: A Historical Survey

An exhaustive treatment of the subject of baptism is not intended in this series of articles. It is desired, rather, to summarise the New Testament teaching concerning it, and then to trace the changes which have taken place in subsequent centuries, both with regard to the mode of baptism and the age of the one baptized.

Wrested Scriptures: Infant Baptism (Mark 10:14 & Matthew 18:4)

“Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not: for of such is the kingdom of God.” (Mark 10:14)

Wrested Scriptures: Baptismal Pouring (Mark 7:4 & Luke 11:38)

“And when they come from the market, except they wash . . .” (Mark 7:4)

Paedobaptism

Paedobaptism, (from παῖς, παιδός, a child, and βαπτισμός, baptism) is applied to the baptism of children or infants in the Christian Church, or what is popularly termed infant baptism. Under the general subject of baptism, it is that part which relates especially to the proper subjects of baptism. SEE BAPTISM.

Infant baptism

Infant baptism is the practice of baptising infants or young children. In theological discussions, the practice is sometimes referred to as paedobaptism or pedobaptism from the Greek pais meaning “child”. The practice is sometimes contrasted with what is called “believer’s baptism,” or credobaptism, from the Latin word credo meaning “I believe,” which is the religious practice of baptising only individuals who personally confess faith in Jesus, therefore excluding underage children. Infant baptism is also called christening by some faith traditions.