Bible Articles on the Topic of Goliath

The following articles have been compiled and indexed by inWORD Bible software.

How Tall Was Goliath?

According to the Masoretic Text of the Old Testament¹ Goliath was six cubits and a span tall, 3.2 metres (9 feet, 6 inches), if measured by the 18 inch cubit, and 3.5 metres (just over 11 feet), if the 21 inch cubit is used. This is a height which is not only highly unlikely for any Iron Age man,² but far beyond what would have been considered a giant at the time.

David and the Head of Goliath of Gath

Everyone knows the story of David and Goliath.  Many are probably not aware, however, of what happened next.  That was the subject of James Hoffmeier’s recent lecture at the Bible and Archaeology Fest.  “Exploring David’s Strange Antics after Defeating Goliath” looked specifically at 1 Samuel 17:53-54:

Golgatha: The Word Symbolizes A Beautiful Reality!

In the Gospels we read that our Lord Jesus Christ was crucified for our sins at a place called “Golgotha.”

Goliath Killed Twice?

“And there was again war with the Philistines at Gob; and Elhanan the son of Jaareoregim, the Bethlehemite, slew Goliath the Gittite, the shaft of whose spear was like a weaver’s beam.” (2 Samuel 21:19)

Myth-busting Gladwell’s Goliath

For many Bible students the workplace occupies much of our waking lives, and it is inevitable that the subjects of religion, belief and spirituality will eventually become a subject of discussion with co-workers. Whilst this is undoubtedly a fantastic opportunity to witness our faith, I often engage in such discourse with a level of apprehension.

Brother Lahmi

In the enumeration by Moses of the strong nations with whom the Israelites had to contend, “which also were accounted giants,” there is the following interesting reference to the early pioneer work of the Philistines in South Canaan:—

Anakim: The Goliaths of Gath

It is most satisfactory to find, as the history of the Israelites unfolds itself, the same indications of truth and accuracy still continuing to present themselves—the same signatures (as it were) of a subscribing witness of credit, impressed on every sheet as we turn it over in its order. The glory of Israel is now brought before us: David comes upon the scene, destined to fill the most conspicuous place in the annals of his country, and furnishing, in the details of his long and eventful life, a series of arguments such as we are in search of, decisive, I think, of the reality of his story, and of the fidelity with which it is told. With these I shall be now for some time engaged.

The Sling, and the Left-Handed, Armless Benjamites

I have said that the Canaanites, who were spared by the Israelites after the first encounter with them, partly that they might derive from the conquered race a tribute, and partly that they might employ them in the servile offices of hewing wood and drawing water, by degrees recovered their spirit, waged war successfully against their invaders, and for many years mightily oppressed Israel. The Philistines, the most formidable of the inhabitants of Canaan, and those under whom the Israelites suffered the most severely, added policy to power. For at their bidding it came to pass (and probably the precaution was adopted by others besides the Philistines), that “there was no smith found throughout all the land of Israel; for the Philistines said, Lest the Hebrews make themselves swords and spears. But all the Israelites went down to the Philistines, to sharpen every man his share, and his coulter, and his axe, and his mattock.” (1 Samuel 13:19)

Giant (mythology)

Giants are the monsters of human appearance but prodigious size and strength common in the mythology and legends of many different cultures. The word giant, coined in 1297, was derived from the gigantes (Greek: γίγαντες) of Greek mythology.

Goliath

(1.) A famous giant of Gath, who for forty days openly defied the armies of Israel, but was at length slain by David with a stone from a sling (1 Samuel 17:4). He was probably descended from the Rephaim who found refuge among the Philistines after they were dispersed by the Ammonites (Deuteronomy 2:20, 21). His height was “six cubits and a span,” which, taking the cubit at 21 inches, is equal to 10 1/2 feet. David cut off his head (1 Samuel 17:51) and brought it to Jerusalem, while he hung the armour which he took from him in his tent. His sword was preserved at Nob as a religious trophy (21:9). David’s victory over Goliath was the turning point in his life. He came into public notice now as the deliverer of Israel and the chief among Saul’s men of war (18:5), and the devoted friend of Jonathan.

Gath

gath (גּת, gath; Septuagint Γέθ, Géth, “winepress”): One of the five chief cities of the Philistines (Joshua 13:3; 1 Samuel 6:17). It was a walled town (2 Chronicles 26:6) and was not taken by Joshua, and, although many conflicts took place between the Israelites and its people, it does not seem to have been captured until the time of David (1 Chronicles 18:1). It was rendered famous as the abode of the giant Goliath whom David slew (1 Samuel 17:4), and other giants of the same race (2 Samuel 21:18-22). It was to Gath that the Ashdodites conveyed the ark when smitten with the plague, and Gath was also smitten (1 Samuel 5:8, 5:9). It was Gath where David took refuge twice when persecuted by Saul (1 Samuel 21:10; 27:2-4). It seems to have been destroyed after being taken by David, for we find Rehoboam restoring it (2 Chronicles 11:8). It was after this reoccupied by the Philistines, for we read that Uzziah took it and razed its walls (2 Chronicles 26:6), but it must have been restored again, for we find Hazael of Damascus capturing it (2 Kings 12:17). It seems to have been destroyed before the time of Amos (Amos 6:2), and is not further mentioned in the Old Testament or Macc, except in Micah 1:10, where it is referred to in the proverb, “Tell it not in Gath” (compare 2 Samuel 1:20). Since its destruction occurred, probably, in the middle of the 8th century BC, it is easy to understand why the site has been lost so that it can be fixed only conjecturally. Several sites have been suggested by different explorers and writers, such as: Tell es Sâfi, Beit Jibrîn, Khurbet Jeladîyeh, Khurbet Abu Geith, Jennata and Yebna (see PEFS, 1871, 91; 1875, 42, 144, 194; 1880, 170-71, 211-23; 1886, 200-202). Tradition in the early centuries AD fixed it at 5 Roman miles North of Eleutheropolis (Beit Jibrîn, toward Lydda, which would indicate Tell es Sâfi as the site, but the Crusaders thought it was at Jamnia (Yebna), where they erected the castle of Ibelin, but the consensus of opinion in modern times fixes upon Tell es Sâfi as the site, as is to be gathered from the references cited in PEFS above. The Biblical notices of Gath would indicate a place in the Philistine plain or the Shephelah, which was fortified, presumably in a strong position on the border of the Philistine country toward the territory of Judah or Dan. Tell es Sâfi fits into these conditions fairly well, but without other proof this is not decisive. It is described in SWP, II, 240, as a position of strength on a narrow ridge, with precipitous cliffs on the North and West, connected with the hills by a narrow neck, so that it is thrust out like a bastion, a position easily fortified. In 1144 Fulke of Anjou erected here a castle called Blanchegarde (Alba Specula). The writer on “Gath and Its Worthies” in PEFS, 1886, 200-204, connects the name Sâfi with that of the giant Saph (2 Samuel 21:18), regarding him as a native of Gath, but the most direct evidence from early tradition connecting Tell es Sâfi with Gath is found in a manuscript said to be in the library of the Patriarchate of Jerusalem, which informs us that Catherocastrum was situated on a mountain called Telesaphion or Telesaphy, which is clearly Tell es Sâfi. Catherocastrum must be the Latin for “camp of Gath” (PEFS, 1906, 305).

Goliath

gō̇-lī ́ath (גּלית, golyāth; Γολιάθ, Goliáth):

Goliath

Goli’ath, (Heb. Golyath’, גָּליִת; Sept. Γολιάθ, Josephus Γολίαθος), a famous giant of Gath, who “morning and evening for forty days” defied the armies of Israel; but was eventually slain by David, in the remarkable encounter, with a sling (1 Samuel 17). B.C. 1063. Although repeatedly called a Philistine, he was possibly descended from the old Rephaim, of whom a scattered remnant took refuge with the Philistines after their dispersion by the Ammonites (Deuteronomy 2:20-21; 2 Samuel 21:22). Some trace of this condition may be preserved in the giant’s name, if it be connected with גּוֹלֶה, an exile, as thought by Gesenius (Thes. Heb. page 285). Simonis, however, derives it from an Arabic word meaning stout (Onom. s.v.); while Fürst merely indicates it as of Philistian etymology (Heb, Lex. s.v.). Hitzig (Gesch. u. Mythol. der Philist. page 76) regards it as merely= Γαυλεύτης, i.e., sorcerer. His height was “six cubits and a span,” which, taking the cubit at 21 inches, would make him 10 1/2 feet high. But the Sept. (at 1 Samuel 17:4) and Josephus (Ant. 6:9,1) read “four cubits and a span.” ‘This will make him about the same- size as the royal champion slain by Anetimenidas, brother of Alceus (ἀπολείποντα μίαν μόνον παχέων ἀπὸ πἐμπων ap. Strabo, 13, page 617, with Müller’s emendation). Even on this computation Goliath would be, as Josephus calls him, ἀνὴρ παμμεγεθἐστατος — a truly enormous man. (See Wichmannshausen, De armatura Gol. Viteb. 1711.) After the victory David cut off Goliath’s head (1 Samuel 17:51; compare Herod. 4:6; Xenoph. Anab. 5:4, 17; Niebuhr mentions a similar custom among the Arabs, Beschr. page 304), which he brought (1 Samel 17:54) to Jerusalem (probably after his accession to the throne, Ewald, Gesch. 3:94), while he hung the armor in his tent. SEE FIGHT. His sword was afterwards received by David in a great emergency from the hands of Ahimelech at Nob, where it had been preserved as a religious trophy. (1 Samuel 21:9). SEE GIANT.

Abner Presenting David with Goliath’s Head Before Saul (1556 engraving)

Goliath

Am I A Dog

Goliath

Cantabant Muslieres Ludentes ac Dicentes (16th c., engraving)

Goliath

Davide with the Head of Goliath

Goliath

David’s Stone

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David’s Victory of Goliath

Goliath

David

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David About to Slay Goliath

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David and Goliath (1509 fresco)

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David and Goliath (1599)

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David and Goliath (16th c. chiaroscuro woodcut)

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David and Goliath (1983)

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David and Goliath (acrylic on paper)

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David and Goliath (oil on canvas)

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David and Goliath

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David and Goliath

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David and Goliath

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David and Goliath

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David and Goliath

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David and Goliath

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David and Goliath

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David and Goliath

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David and Goliath

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David and Goliath

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David and Goliath

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David and Goliath

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David and Goliath

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David Beheading Goliath (16th c. chiaroscuro woodcut)

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David Beheading Goliath

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David Contemplating the Head of Goliath

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David Cutting Off Goliath’s Head (1898, Child’s Story of the Bible)

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David Kills Goliath

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David Kills Goliath

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David Picks Up a Stone

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David Raising Sword to Decapitate a Fallen Goliath Among Battling Soldiers

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David Returns with Goliath’s Head (18th c. earthenware)

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David Slaying Goliath

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David Slaying Goliath

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David Slays the Philistine

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David Slings the Stone

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David Slings the Stone

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David Slings the Stone

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David with Head of Goliath (1514)

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David with the Head of Goliath (1680 oil)

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David with the Head of Goliath (17th c. etching)

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David with the Head of Goliath (ca. 1635)

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David with the Head of Goliath (ca. 1670 oil on canvas)

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David with the Head of Goliath

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David with the Head of Goliath

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David with the Head of Goliath

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David with the Head of Goliath

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David with the Head of Goliath

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Defiance of Goliath

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Giant Miniature Golf

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Goliath’s DNA

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Goliath’s School Day Dilemma

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Goliath and the Philistines

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Goliath Disdain for David

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Infixus est Lapis in Fronte Philistei (16th c., engraving)

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The Philistine Giant

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The story of David

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The Triumphant David (1619)

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The Triumph of David (1750s oil)

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The Triumph of David

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The Triumph of David

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The Triumph of Saul (17th c. oil/pencil)

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The Triumph of Saul (17th c. oil/pencil, inset)

Goliath

Acromegaly

Acromegaly is a condition that results from excess growth hormone (GH) after the growth plates have closed. The initial symptom is typically enlargement of the hands and feet. There may also be enlargement of the forehead, jaw, and nose. Other symptoms may include joint pain, thicker skin, deepening of the voice, headaches, and problems with vision. Complications of the disease may include type 2 diabetes, sleep apnea, and high blood pressure.

Gigantism

Gigantism, also known as giantism (from Greek γίγας gigas, “giant,” plural γίγαντες gigantes), is a condition characterized by excessive growth and height significantly above average. In humans, this condition is caused by over-production of growth hormone in childhood resulting in people between 7 feet (2.13 m) and 9 feet (2.75 m) in height.

Goliath

Goliath (/gəˈlaɪəθ/; Hebrew: גָּלְיָת, Modern Golyat, Tiberian Golyāṯ; Arabic: ?????, Ǧālūt (Qur’anic term), ????? Ǧulyāt (Christian term)) of Gath (one of five city states of the Philistines) was a giant Philistine warrior defeated by the young David, the future king of Israel. The story is told in the Bible’s Books of Samuel (1 Samuel 17).