Bible Articles on the Topic of Baptize

The following articles have been compiled and indexed by inWORD Bible software.

Julie and the Baptismal Card

When our son Adam was baptized, a sister [in the Lord, by the name of] Julie, went looking for a card to celebrate the baptism. Julie worked in downtown San Antonio, a city which is predominantly Hispanic and Catholic. She knew there was a “religious” shop near her office, and she assumed that she would be able to find a suitable card there. So off she went at lunch.

The Baptism of Wooden Vessels and Couches

“The washing of cups, and pots, brasen vessels, and of tables.” (Mark 7:4)

Laying Down a Baptismal Formula

H.F. asks: “Can you explain this verse? If the Holy Spirit is the manifestation of the Father, why are men to be baptised into this manifestation as well as into the Father?"

Baptism (The Baptist Interpretation)

This article is not a discussion of the whole subject, but is merely a presentation of the Baptist interpretation of the ordinance. The origin and history of the ordinance, as a whole, do not come within the range of the present treatment.

Baptismal Regeneration

bap-tiz ́mal rē̇-jen-ẽr-ā ́shun: As indicated in the general articles on BAPTISM and SACRAMENTS, the doctrine ordinarily held by Presbyterians, Congregationalists, Baptists, Methodists, and also by Low-Church Episcopalians, differs from that of the Roman and Greek churches, and of High-Church Anglicans, in its rejection of the idea that baptism is the instrumental cause of regeneration, and that the grace of regeneration is effectually conveyed through the administration of that rite wherever duly performed. The teaching of Scripture on this subject is held to be that salvation is immediately dependent on faith, which, as a fruit of the operation of the Spirit of God in the soul, already, in its reception of Christ, implies the regenerating action of that Spirit, and is itself one evidence of it. To faith in Christ is attached the promise of forgiveness, and of all other blessings. Baptism is administered to those who already possess (at least profess) this faith, and symbolizes the dying to sin and rising to righteousness implicit in the act of faith (Romans 6). It is the symbol of a cleansing from sin and renewal by God’s Spirit, but not the agency effecting that renewal, even instrumentally. Baptism is not, indeed, to be regarded as a bare symbol. It may be expected that its believing reception will be accompanied by fresh measures of grace, strengthening and fitting for the new life. This, however, as the life is already there, has nothing to do with the idea of baptism as an opus operatum, working a spiritual change in virtue of its mere administration. In Scripture the agency with which regeneration is specially connected is the Divine “word” (compare 1 Peter 1:23). Without living faith, in those capable of its exercise, the outward rite can avail nothing. The supposed “regeneration” may be received—in multitudes of instances is received—without the least apparent change in heart or life.

Trine (Triune) Immersion

trīn trī ́ūn i-mûr ́shun:

Mikweh

Literally, a “collection,” a “collected mass,” especially of water (Genesis 1:10; Exodus 7:19; Leviticus 11:36; comp. Isaiah 22:11). Because of the use made of this word in connection with ritual purification (Leviticus 11:36), it has become the term commonly used to designate the ritual bath. In all cases of ritual impurity it was necessary for the person or object to be immersed in a bath built in accordance with the rules laid down by the Rabbis (see Ablution; Baths; Purity). Since the Dispersion the custom of observing the laws of purity has on the whole fallen into desuetude, except in the case of the impure woman (see Niddah). With regard to her the laws are still observed in most Orthodox communities, and therefore the ritual miḳweh is still a necessary institution there. Some observant Jews, especially among the Ḥasidim, immerse themselves in the miḳweh in cases also of impurity other than niddah.

Saul’s Baptism

baptize